Category Archives: Learner-Centered

Politics & Religion in America

Religion remains a powerful force in American political life, despite perspectives that the US is becoming more secular. This Humanities course examines the relationship between religion and politics from a variety of social and philosophical perspectives while establishing a historical framework within which to assess the role of religion in contemporary politics.

The slideshow shown here relies on interactive media to provide a visually-rich approach to the subject matter while giving students freedom to explore a variety of resources and topics at their own pace. While browsing the digital photos and portraits of historic and contemporary political figures, students can read notable quotes and follow links to biographical information.

GPS Fuels Scientific Discovery

Mapblog screen shot

Screen shots: Students collect data about their location using a handheld GPS and post to the mapblog (left). Then, students calculate the geographic center of everyone in the course (right).

Employing mapblogs with student-created content helps foster class cohesion and collaboration. In GPS and the New Geography as well as several other science courses, the use of Google-based mapblogs provide a visual data platform where students are able to contribute information, images and links related to specific locations. In the GPS course, they find the exact longitude and latitude of their own locale using a handheld GPS, underscoring the importance of accuracy and precision in geographic calculations. Later in the course they calculate the geographic center relative to the location of all students in the course.

According to the National Research Council (NRC), online learning should strengthen science education by providing students with digital content that enables them to gather, analyze, and display data. The mapblog serves this purpose wonderfully and in a hands-on way while adding to the sense of community students experience.

No More Flashcards: Learning and Teaching Foreign Language With Digital Imagery

 

In foreign language courses at CDL, we encourage students to interact with visual content in order to immerse them in the language by providing context and meaning to their learning experiences.  

The traditional ‘flash card’ approach to teaching and learning foreign language  relies primarily on memorization and subsequent translation.  Through the use of visual and dynamic content (shown above), instructors and students can rely on ostensive learning.  That is, students are able to manipulate and change visual images in order to learn, define and translate any given vocabulary word or phrase.

The use of visual tools can augment the curriculum of any language course by offering students a chance to interact with the language, and derive meaning through the provision of familiar context.

Using Interactive Maps to Teach Foreign Language Online

  screen shot of interactive map 

Through the use of interactive maps, students gain a better understanding of the Francophone world as part of their work in the foreign language course,  French 2.  This highly interactive learning activity provides a geographic and demographic view of French language and culture throughout the world.

Students select to explore various regions that are highlighted on the map in order to identify historically and culturally significant events, places and people, and examine how they influence and represent the evolution and use of the French language.

Teaching Foreign Language Online

voice thread screen shot of desertsDeveloping new and innovative ways to teach foreign language, CDL is incorporating VoiceThread into various courses, including Spanish for the World of Business. VoiceThread is a digital medium for housing, displaying and distributing nearly any type of media (images, documents and videos).  VoiceThread allows students taking the Spanish course to collect media files, display them, and comment on them in 5 different ways - by using a  microphone, a telephone, using written text, an audio file, or recording a video with a web cam. Students can create and share their media with anyone, anywhere. 

Additionally, VoiceThread hosts group conversations, allowing students to practice their Spanish by sharing their thoughts on their media collections – in this case, their most loved and most hated foods.

screen shot of voice thread pageStudents taking this course also use VoiceThread to market a product of their choice, in Spanish. The product can be food, computer software, services, a store, etc.  Students write their own advertisement and present it to the class, while the instructor and other students will record and share their own comments, in Spanish.

 

2010 Curriculum Retreat: A Shared Vision

Held at 113 West Avenue in Saratoga Springs, the 2010 Curriculum Retreat fostered meaningful conversation and highlighted the ongoing collaboration between Center for Distance Learning (CDL)  faculty and Curriculum & Instructional Designers (CIDs). On February 9th ,  faculty from across the disciplines gathered together for a full day of discussion and contemplation on the current and future state of the curriculum at SUNY Empire State College’s Center for Distance Learning.

New to the retreat this year, members of the Technology in Action Committee took the initiative to demonstrate the flexibility and unique capabilties of the Angel Learning Management System (LMS) currently being used at CDL.  Members of the CID group were called upon to present alternative content design approaches using the Angel LMS.

Highlights included presentations on the following content design approaches in Angel:

The Easter Egg

The Graphic Organizer

The Taskbar

The Humanities Desktop

Dr. Nicola Martinez, then Director of Curriculum and Instructional Design at CDL, also gave a brief overview of processes related to the infusion of creative design elements in courses, and encouraged faculty from all areas of study to continue collaboration with the CID group and promote ongoing innovation in courses offered by CDL.

Future Genesis: The Transformation Station Tour Guide

Future Genesis is the Second Life avatar name of the machine driven cyborg designed to serve as a station tour guide in a futuristic transformation station that provide students with a unique experience in changing avatar identity prior to sending them on a journey of scientific discovery through Second Life worlds. 

This immersive simulation is the Second Life component of an interdisciplinary science course titled the Future of Being Human.Throughout this course, students discuss biological enhancements, advances in neuroscience, medical breakthroughs, technological change and exponential computing. They use scientific experimentation to analyze how the experience of virtuality is changing human beings and their environments and assess implications of science and technology policies related to technological advances. Finally, they participate in a simulation of virtuality reflecting Vittorio Gallese’s theory of embodied simulation. 

The immersive learning activity provides students with the opportunity to experience transformation, transport to various worlds, and explore future, past and imagined worlds in their new form. Students use scientific methodology within a framework of biological advances, artificial life, and emerging technologies, and write a 500-word scientific report based on their experiences.  To do this, students enter the transformation station, transform their avatar, and receive a heads-up display (HUD) to guide them through exploration and discovery using the scientific method.

The machine driven avatar Future Genesis was developed as a solution to provide students with 24/7 assistance in introducing the student to the transformation station and providing hands-on instructions on how to operate the station, transform avatars, and receive the heads-up display.

Dual Wiki Support System

The Dual Wiki Support System offers a flexible activity that adapts to student interests and needs, provides unique assignments, and encourages collaboration. It also provides a place for students to reflect on their own work. It operates by using two wikis in conjunction: in the first wiki, students determine topics of research that they will work on together in the second wiki. Each wiki has an area where students can share and expound upon their research strategies.

Introduction to College Studies uses this tool for an activity in which students determine the five areas of college study habits where they need the most improvement. Students then address each issue. The first wiki offers a space where each student proposes the five areas in which he or she needs to improve. The class then works together and decides which five areas most affect the group as a whole. In the second wiki the students create a post for each of the five agreed areas from the first wiki. Collectively students develop strategies to overcome these problem areas. In the comment sections, students reflect and explain their decisions in a class-wide discussion.

Wife Swap! Tying Texts to Written Assignments

Role Swap!
In U.S. Women’s History: Lives and Voices, the texts examine the three prevalent kinds of families in Colonial America: Native American families, slave families and English/European families. An early assignment in the course requires students to imagine (in writing) a wife-swap situation in which one woman temporarily changes places with a woman from another kind of family, using the articles in their texts as sources. 
  • In the first part of the essay, describe your daily life before the swap. Describe where you live, what kind of family you have, and how you relate to your husband, your children and your community. You may be a white colonial woman, a slave woman or a Native American woman.
  • In the second part of your essay, describe the changes that took place during  the swap. How are the women in your new culture treated by the men in their families? What new roles and expectations do you have? How is your daily life different from the one you were accustomed to?
  • In the third part of your essay, describe the learning you took back to your own family after the swap. What would you tell your family about your experience with the other culture? Would your experiences change your attitudes and behavior towards that culture in any way? Explain your answers.

Creating Social Policies for the 21st Century

The fall of the Berlin Wall.

The fall of the Berlin Wall.

Privacy, Security and Freedom:  Social Concerns for the 21st Century is a course that explores the sociological and philosophical aspects of privacy, security and freedom in the 21st Century in the context of both theoretical and practical, policy-oriented aspects of these social concerns. To that end, one course exercise requires students to develop a hypothetical scenario on a security issue — school security or computer network security — and a policy that addresses the concerns raised by the scenario. Students choose one of the two options and then work in teams to develop the scenario and the policy.

First, the teams meet in their own discussion areas to share research results and to reach consensus on details of the scenario. Each group then begins the collaborative writing of the scenario in Buzzword, an online word processing tool that allows multiple users to edit the document at the same time (or not). These documents are then posted and each team can review and comment on the other’s submissions.

Next, the teams develop the security policy. They return to their designated discussion area and again share research and reach consensus on a policy approach that, in their opinion, will best address the issue. The teams return to Buzzword and fashion a new document, working collaboratively, until all agree it is ready to be submitted to the instructor. Each team can review and comment on the other’s submissions.

This activity not only gives students an opportunity to apply in a practical way the sociological and philosophical aspects of security they have studied, they also have the opportunity to work as a team, including all the real-life implications of developing policy with people who may not have a single shared perspective.