Tag Archives: visual learning style

Virtual Field Trips Offer Inspiration and Expertise

 

National Geographic- Jim Richardson; Ansel Adams; Box Set Gallery - Chris Enos

One popular art course, The Photographic Vision, employs virtual field trips to enhance the student experience. Primarily an overview of photography, its history and the many genres it encompasses, this course also teaches hands-on techniques. The field trips are designed to expose students to a wealth of historical, educational and artistic knowledge directly related to each module’s topic. A visit to the American Museum of Photography provides a history of the discipline, as well as unique exhibitions and research resources. The websites of individual photographers and galleries offer high-quality, contextualized images and lessons in presentation. These in turn assist students as they complete their own photographic assignments for group critiques.

Throughout the course, students take full advantage of experts working in diverse photographic specialities such as journalism, portraiture and documentation.  At the National Geographic Magazine site, students find professional advice on specific topics such as “Taking Photos in the Rain” or “Shooting with Available Light” in addition to the vast archive of the magazine’s renown images.

During an exploration of nature photography, students visit the website of master Ansel Adams. In a culminating module on fine art photography, inspirational examples include the modern color work of Chris Enos as well as the dreamy, black and white images of Dianne Duenzl, both of Box Set Gallery.

Virtual field trips offer countless pedagogical benefits, the results of which are often evident in lively online discussions grounded in shared experience.

Technology Made Easy: Teaching Tools for Instructors

For instructors to maintain a presence and foster a mentoring relationship in their courses, they don’t want to spend the majority of their time trying to learn a new technology. Because the online environment is in a constant state of flux, it might seem like there is always something new to learn about – and that requires an investment of time, which is in short supply for most of us these days.  Our new courses at CDL include Instructor Notes, informational materials written specifically for instructors to allow ease with the new teaching tools and resources. Providing this instructional material to instructors may seem redundant at first, but it allows our teachers to spend more time focusing on their students, and less time troubleshooting new technology.

The use of the Mapblog in courses offers a unique example. Because the Mapblog tool has been upgraded over time, it now includes that many more features  and can therefore be daunting to new, or even seasoned instructors who are not consistently working with the tool.  To address this issue, now included with the upgrade to the new mapblogs, CDL has released interactive instructional material for instructors that quickly review the pedagogical principles of the mapblog, offers tips for grading, and provides instructions for getting started.

Get Glogging! Go on, Poster Yourself!

Students in the Play, Fantasy and Reality course use Glogster to keep a 15-week reflective journal.  In week 15, the final week of the course, they re-read their Glog Journal and create a second Glog to describe their “play” throughout their life.  Glogging is a new way to create posters on the web – it’s fun, and free for students.  

Glogging allows the expression of opinions, feelings and ideas in a way that isn’t possible with the use of mere words. Students can add background images and themes, graphical representations, photos, titles, audio, links and videos.  After a Glog is created, students publish and share theirs with classmates.

No More Flashcards: Learning and Teaching Foreign Language With Digital Imagery

 

In foreign language courses at CDL, we encourage students to interact with visual content in order to immerse them in the language by providing context and meaning to their learning experiences.  

The traditional ‘flash card’ approach to teaching and learning foreign language  relies primarily on memorization and subsequent translation.  Through the use of visual and dynamic content (shown above), instructors and students can rely on ostensive learning.  That is, students are able to manipulate and change visual images in order to learn, define and translate any given vocabulary word or phrase.

The use of visual tools can augment the curriculum of any language course by offering students a chance to interact with the language, and derive meaning through the provision of familiar context.

Using Video to Teach Drawing

A picture can say a million words.  Illustrating the various ways to draw perspective can be vastly more effective with the use of video. In Introduction to Studio Art, we use mash-ups (web 2.0 web application hybrid), to create an interactive video tutorial that illustrates 1, 2 and 4 point perspective. Tutorials like these augment the instructions and assignments.

Using the tools in the mashup you can enlarge areas, use the fullscreen option, stop video play, or enlarge the small video screen. The slider-bar, located below the mashup, or the side tabs, allow easy access to other tutorials.